In the modern age, the landscape for the foodie has evolved. Gone are the days when the term “foodie” was delegated only to those who posted fancy photos of food at gourmet restaurants. Modern foodies are influencing conversations all over the blogosphere and online world, and they are cooking and experimenting way more than you might think.  Time for those marketing healthy food to listen up.

One thing that hasn’t changed? Foodies are in pursuit of great taste. Except now, they’re doing it closer to home…in their own kitchens. They want the control in their hands, so they’re making home cooking about exploration rather than simply getting food on the plate. The numbers are pretty staggering…75% of them cook at home several times a week, and 93% of those cook daily for themselves and their families daily as opposed to eating out. They love being in control of their health and their appetite, as well as their families.

American foodies are taking back the kitchen because creativity is important to them. But it’s no longer just about a creative Instagram post. The new foodie instead turns to social media for inspiration, acting as voyeurs of sorts, perusing both brand and blogger social media sites alike. The social media scene can’t be undervalued seeing as 90% use Facebook, 73% use Instagram, followed by 36% of Pinterest and 19% on Twitter.

Foodies are also relying on their own instincts more than anything else. They will follow online recipes, but with their own spin on it. And when it comes to grocery shopping, as many as 88% prefer to buy food in grocery stores, and 52% from local producers. They are not about online ordering. They’d rather see and touch the ingredients for themselves.

So what’s this all mean for marketing? Well…a lot.

Those marketing healthy food need to recognize the foodie creative process. They don’t want discounts or coupons. In fact, they’d rather pay more for the best. Instead, they want to improve on their skills in the kitchen and teach themselves new things.

As far as engagement, the modern foodie doesn’t want to comment on a brand’s social media page…they’d rather you comment on theirs. They don’t want to be a part of conversations they don’t feel like their driving. Control is definitely a theme.  Marketing healthy food is becoming more of an active sport than a passive one.

Brands also need to work on their in-store presentation. Foodies won’t buy something that doesn’t look good. But at the same time, they are extremely educated and can’t be tricked by advertising and packaging. They want it to look good because it IS good. This generation of foodie will read labels, so transparency is key.

And if there’s one point to really drive home, foodies are the ones driving conversations. The average consumer is much more likely to listen to a foodie than listen to a brand, so if you impress them, good or bad, it will have a domino effect. They will post about you. They will create conversations about you. And they will impact your business one way or the other. Better to make it positive.

And if there’s one point to really drive home, foodies are the ones driving conversations. The average consumer is much more likely to listen to a foodie than listen to a brand, so if you impress them, good or bad, it will have a domino effect. They will post about you. They will create conversations about you. And they will impact your business one way or the other. Better to make it positive.  Gone are the days where marketing healthy food is a one-way street.